April202014

wingsofwriting:

capo-verde:

envycamacho:

kim-jong-healthy:

humpback whales in their natural habitat before deforestation forced them into the sea

this is actually so cool

Fuck

I THOUGHT THEY WERE DRAGONS.

(via this-is-a-no-fun-zone)

12PM
Black Widow #5 

(Source: wintorsoldier, via soulquestion)

April192014
April182014

corsolareef:

"begin your essay with an interesting fact or quote"
image
im gonna fucking ACE this essay

(via sautdebasque)

jfc 

10AM
April172014
“Until you’re about the age of twenty, you read everything, and you like it simply because you are reading it. Then between twenty and thirty you pick what you want, and you read the best, you read all the great works. After that you sit and wait for them to be written. But you know, the least known, the least famous writers, they are the better ones.” Rest in peace, Gabriel García Márquez. (via theatlantic)

(via theatlantic)

April152014

the-one-blog-to-rule-them-all:

i think it would be neat if netflix doubled as a dating site like “here are 9 other singles in your area that watched supernatural for 12 straight hours”

(via gyzym)

4PM
acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

(Source: pleatedjeans, via thatweirdo-intheduckieshirt)

2PM

sehler:

One Song a Day: 141/

Galapogos | Smashing Pumpkins

Carve out your heart for keeps in an old oak tree
And hold me for goodbyes and whispered lullabies
And tell me I am still the man I’m supposed to be
I won’t deny the pain
I won’t deny the change
And should I fall from grace here with you,
Will you leave me too?

(8 plays)
11AM

gcatherinev:

"They’re always such alive females. And also, all those love stories - no man in Austen has ever fallen in love with a female heroine because she’s pretty or beautiful or has long, blonde hair. They fall in love with them because of who they are, because of their vibrancy and their intelligence and if only we were teaching that a bit more in schools." x

(via drunkausten)

← Older entries Page 1 of 389